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Reading 38 B3

Clinically Important Symptoms of PTSD

People with clinically important symptoms of PTSD (Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder) refer to those who are assessed as having PTSD on a validated scale, as indicated by baseline scores above clinical threshold, but who do not necessarily have a diagnosis of PTSD. They are typically referred to in studies that have not used a clinical interview to arrive at a formal diagnosis of PTSD and instead have only used self-report measures of PTSD symptoms. Complex PTSD develops in a subset of people with PTSD. It can arise after exposure to an event or series of events of an extremely threatening or horrific nature, most commonly prolonged or repetitive events from which escape is difficult or impossible. The disorder is characterized by the core symptoms of PTSD; that is, all diagnostic requirements for PTSD are met.

  • Question of

    According to this article, people with PTSD have:

    • a high score on a validated scale, which includes complex PTSD factors.
    • have experienced prolonged or repetitive symptoms.
    • have not been examined by qualified clinicians.

    Correct Wrong

    Explanation: The passage clearly states that people with clinically important symptoms of PTSD in the context provided "are typically referred to in studies that have not used a clinical interview to arrive at a formal diagnosis of PTSD and instead have only used self-report measures of PTSD symptoms." This means that these individuals have not been formally examined by qualified clinicians. Options A and B do not accurately reflect the key points described in the passage.

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Reading 38 B2

Reading 38 B4