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OET Reading Test 2

Reading Sub-test Part A

Questions 1-7

For each question, 1 – 7, decide which text (A, B, C or D) the information comes from. You may use any letter more than once.

Questions 8 – 14

Answer each of the questions, 8 – 14, with a word or short phrase from one of the texts. Each answer may include words, numbers or both.

Questions 15 – 20

Complete each of the sentences, 15 – 20, with a word or short phrase from one
of the texts. Each answer may include words, numbers or both.

Now, proceed to the questions below. Let’s Play!

A colostomy is a surgical procedure that brings one end of the large intestine out through the abdominal wall. During this procedure, one end of the colon is diverted through an incision in the abdominal wall to create a stoma. A stoma is the opening in the skin where a pouch for collecting feces is attached. People with temporary or long-term colostomies have pouches attached to their sides where feces collect and can be easily disposed of. Colostomies aren’t always permanent, especially in children with birth defects.

Before surgery, your doctor will take blood samples, perform a physical examination, and review your complete medical history. During these visits, tell your doctor about any prior surgeries you’ve had and any medications you’re taking, including over-the-counter medicines and supplements.

Your doctor will likely ask you to fast for at least 12 hours before surgery. You may also be given a laxative or an enema to take the night before the surgery to help cleanse your bowels. You should prepare to stay in the hospital for three to seven days. This includes packing the right necessities, arranging care for your children, pets, or home, and taking the appropriate amount of time off of work.

Recovery in the hospital involves being slowly reintroduced to liquids and foods to ensure there are no digestive problems. On the first day, you’ll most likely be given only ice chips to ease your thirst. Afterward, you’ll be given clear liquids and eventually soft foods. You’ll also be taught how to use colostomy bags correctly. A colostomy bag is where your feces will collect while you have your colostomy. Hospital staff will also instruct you on your diet, activity level, and more. It’s important to follow these instructions. You’ll have follow-up appointments with your doctor to check on your condition and the colostomy.

The clinical situation and experience of the examiner will often dictate which of several methods to employ in performing the rectal examination. In the lithotomy position, the patient is supine with the legs drawn in toward the trunk and the knees allowed to fall out to the side. This position is customarily used when examining the pelvic organs in women and may offer a better examination of the anterior rectum. The lateral decubitus, or Sim’s position, provides optimal examination when the patient is too ill or otherwise unable to assume other positions. The patient lies on the left side with the buttocks near the edge of the examining table or bedside with the right knee and hip in slight flexion. 

  • Question of

    In which text do you find information about “prior surgeries”?

    • Text A
    • Text B
    • Text C
    • Text D
  • Question of

    In which text do you find information about “preparing home before surgery”?

    • Text A
    • Text B
    • Text C
    • Text D
  • Question of

    In which text do you find information about “fasting before surgery”?

    • Text A
    • Text B
    • Text C
    • Text D
  • Question of

    In which text do you find information about “the use of colostomy bags”?

    • Text A
    • Text B
    • Text C
    • Text D
  • Question of

    In which text do you find information about “sitting position for rectal examination”?

    • Text A
    • Text B
    • Text C
    • Text D
  • Question of

    In which text do you find information about “position suitable for patients too ill to assume other positions”?

    • Text A
    • Text B
    • Text C
    • Text D
  • Question of

    In which text do you find information about “food intake after surgery”?

    • Text A
    • Text B
    • Text C
    • Text D

Written by Biju John

Love for English begins with understanding its unknown rules. Biju John lives on the internet, teaching OET, IELTS and PTE. More than a million students have thanked him from their heart.

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