Nouns

Nouns are of many kinds. Here are some of them:

  • Proper Noun – Nouns of people, places, organizations. These nouns start with a capital letter. “Mr Parker, Sydney, English Melon, etc.”
  • Common Noun – Nouns that do not have a proper name. “Man, woman, child, baby, etc.”
  • Collective Noun – Names of collections. “Army,
  • Abstract Noun – Names of emotions, qualities, etc. that we cannot see or touch. Examples include, “medicine, pain, color, prognosis,” etc.

Nouns

On Day 1 we saw Subjects are Nouns and Pronouns. Today let’s learn more specifically about Nouns. We all know that a noun is a name that we call anything around us.

  • Mr Ludwich (A male)
  • Ms Sumitra (A female)
  • Paracetamol (Medicine)
  • Recovery (A condition)
  • Diabetes (A disease)

Similarly, there are various kinds of nouns and let’s learn about them.

There are mainly 4 kinds of nouns and you should know each very clearly and distinctly.

Common Nouns

Common nouns are used to refer to anyone, anything in common. Anyone can be a “patient” or “child” but when you say “Mr Peter is my patient”, we are particularly referring to a person called Peter. Common nouns have no particular “names” like ‘Peter’, ‘Sydney’ or ‘Aspirin.’

  • Patient
  • Child
  • Hospital
  • Mother
  • Father
  • Doctor
  • Nurse

NB: When common nouns are written ‘inside’ a sentence, we do not Capitalize its first letter.

“Father told me that he would educate me to become a nurse or doctor.” (Did you notice that Father starts with F big but “nurse” and “doctor” do not? This is only because it is the starting word of a sentence!)

Proper Nouns

If the common nouns have any particular names, they are Proper Nouns.

  • Ms Leonie Walker (A patient with a name)
  • Mr Sam Baker (Another patient with a name)
  • Golden Home Nursing Home (A hospital with a name)
  • X-Ray, MRI and CT
  • Ms Stella is my patient.
  • Charles is a 4 year old boy.
  • Dr Rahman has treated Ms Stella and Charles.
  • Ms Stella and Charles are doing better now.
  • Mr Peter is Charles’ father.

NB: Attention! The first letter of a Proper Noun should be Capital (big) letter. You can note that all the above Proper Nouns begin in a Capital letter.

Collective Nouns

Collective Nouns are always a headache for many.

  • A dose of aspirin and clopidogrel is highly recommended.
  • A chain of incidents has been reported.

Attention! Most collective nouns look like plural (more than one) but they are singular.

  • A crowd scares such people who are under treatment for this mental illness. (Didn’t you think “crowd” is plural?)

Abstract Nouns

Unlike the Common and Proper Nouns, Abstract Nouns cannot be touched or seen. They are mostly names of feelings, experiences, qualities, etc.

  • Consciousness
  • Pain
  • Relief
  • Improvement
  • Diagnosis
  • Blindness

Attention! Some abstract nouns also appear like plural. Look how the subject (Medication) and verb (cost) clash with each other.

  • Incorrect – Medication for such ailments often cost very high.
  • Correct – Medication for such ailments often costs very high.

Didn’t understand that? Don’t worry, we will discuss that in detail in an upcoming Day!

Nouns as Subjects

On Day 1 we saw that Subjects are usually nouns or pronouns to begin any sentence.

  • Ms Stella is a social drinker.
  • The patient needs continuous monitoring at your facility.
  • Baby Ryan and his mother have been discharged.
  • Mr Herriot receives early retirement pension.

Singular Subjects & Plural Subjects

The greatest confusion is Singular and Plural. Many words that you have been thinking as singular are plural and many words you think plural are singular. Probably our poor understanding of what is one (singular) and what are many (plural) is the root cause of most of the grammar errors.

Hope you will read more carefully from this point.

Singular and Plural Nouns

  • Mr Ray’s relative → Mr Ray’s relatives
  • The patient → The patients
  • The child’s parent → The child’s parents
  • A dose of this medicine → Some doses of these medicine/s
  • A boy → Some boys
  • Girl → Girls
  • Baby → Babies
  • Lady → Ladies
  • Potato → Potatoes
  • Mouse → Mice
  • Louse → Lice
  • Man → Men
  • Woman → Women
  • Child → Children
  • Fish → Fish / Fishes
  • Hair → Hair / Hairs
  • News → News
  • Furniture → Furniture
  • Information → Information
  • Equipment → Equipment
  • Economics → Economics
  • Mathematics → Mathematics
  • Crowd → Crowds
  • Team → Teams
  • Bunch → Bunches
  • Committee → Committees
  • Bravery → Bravery
  • Courage → Courage
  • Pride → Pride
  • Patriotism → Patriotism
  • Money → Money
  • Water → Water
  • Honey → Honey
  • Honesty → Honesty
  • My dog → Our dogs
  • His house → Their houses
  • Good news → Good news
  • Her baby → Their Babies
  • This cat → These cats
  • That horse → Those horses
  • Its tail → Their tails
  • My child → Our children
  • This woman → These women
  • That man → Those men

Singular Nouns & Plural Nouns

  • Boy → Boys → A boy is waiting for other boys.
  • Man → Men → Many men can do what a man alone cannot.
  • Woman → Women → Most women think that a woman should be equal to man.
  • Lady → Ladies → Ladies and gentlemen, let’s listen to this lady tonight!
  • Child → Children → Dear child, your parents too were children many years ago.
  • Fish → Fish/ Fishes → I went to catch the same kind of fish but I got many kinds of fishes.
  • Hair → Hair / Hairs → There were different kinds of hairs on display but there none like my hair.
  • Parent → Parents → The schools wanted my parents to attend the meeting but only one parent agreed to attend.

Nouns that are both Singular and Plural

  • Money -Money
  • People – People
  • Equipment – Equipment
  • Furniture – Furniture
  • News – News
  • Knowledge – Knowledge
  • Information – Information
  • Mathematics – Mathematics
  • Economics – Economics
  • Singular that Appears Plural
  • People – Peoples
  • Crowd – Crowds
  • Army – Armies
  • Class – Classes
  • Mob – Mobs
  • Assembly – Assemblies
  • Pair – Pairs
  • Score – Scores
  • Dozen – Dozen.

Tasks

  • Change the sentences into plural

This medicine is harmful to a pregnant woman. (Change ‘medicine’ into plural)

  • This medicines are harmful to pregnant women.
  • These medicines are harmful to pregnant womans.
  • These medicines are harmful to pregnant women.

Besides that, she had previous hospitalization for jaundice which was treated successfully. (Change “she” to plural)

  • Besides that, they had previous hospitalization for jaundice which was treated successfully.
  • Besides that, they had previous hospitalization for jaundice which were treated successfully.
  • Besides that, they had previous hospitalization for jaundices which were treated successfully.

During the review, he was found comfortable and doing well. (Change)

  • During the review, they were found comfortable and doing well.
  • During the reviews, they were found comfortable and doing well.
  • During reviews, they were found comfortable and doing well.

Her discharge has been scheduled for today. (Change “her” to plural)

  • Their discharge has been scheduled for today.
  • Their discharges have been scheduled for today.
  • Hers discharge has been scheduled for today.

A relevant document that would render help Mrs Edith’s care is enclosed with this letter. (Change “document” to plural)

  • All relevant documents that would help Mrs Edith’s care are enclosed with this letter.
  • All relevant documents that would help Mrs Edith’s care is enclosed with this letter.
  • All relevant documents that would help Mrs Edith’s cares are enclosed with this letter.

This is not the right diagnosis. (Change “this” to plural)

  • These are not the right diagnoses.
  • These are not the right diagnosises.
  • These are not the right diagnosis.

Her brother is mentally unwell. (Change all the nouns to plural)

  • Their brother is mentally unwell.
  • Their brothers are mentally unwell.
  • Her brothers are mentally unwell.

Say if the nouns below are Common, Proper, Collective or Abstract Noun.

Written by Biju John

Love for English begins with understanding its unknown rules. Biju John lives on the internet, teaching OET, IELTS and PTE. More than a million students have thanked him from their heart.

Positive & Negative Sentences

Verbs – Doing, Being, Having