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OET Reading Step 1 – Understand Text

The biggest error 90% of the OET candidates commit is that they are after answer keys and scores. They hardly worry about “understanding the text.” Below, you can read texts and paragraphs taken from Part A, B and C Reading. Go to each page and write your answers on the notebook.

Part C Model

Anxiety doesn’t recognize class or race. It ignores age and gender. And it gives no deference to talent, wealth or perceived success. A popular blogger, a media celebrity, but still at odds with the demands of the life she has chosen, Sarah talked of the terrible toll taken by modern life: “Anxiety is on the increase. We are overstimulated. “We used to have boundaries, and we had cultural mores and structures that protected us from these kinds of primal blowouts. “We had a Sabbath because we all had an understanding that we needed a day of rest just to be able to cope with the toil of hoeing a field, and also to spend time with family; and we had set bedtime hours and we had set work hours. There were boundaries that were placed by our culture and structures. That has gone out the window in literally less than a generation.” In the past Sarah shut herself away, taking time off from the outside world — a forced retreat. But her new way of dealing with her anxiety is to embrace it. To acknowledge its dangers, to be wary, and then to try to harness it to her advantage as a tool for positive change.

What do the following lines mean?

01. Anxiety doesn’t recognize class or race.

  1. People of high race do not have anxiety.
  2. High class people have more anxiety than low-class people.
  3. Anxiety affects anyone

2. It ignores age and gender.

  1. At certain age, people do not have anxiety.
  2. Anyone, male or female, young or old, have anxiety.
  3. Aged men and women ignore anxiety.

3. And it gives no deference to talent, wealth or perceived success.

  1. If you are talented, you will definitely have anxiety.
  2. Anxiety is found in talented, rich and successful people.
  3. Talented people will have anxiety because they are after success.

3. What is not true about Sarah?

  1. She is a blogger.
  2. She is a media celebrity.
  3. She is a young person.

4. For Sarah, modern life:

  1. Has been promising.
  2. Has been a nightmare.
  3. Has been a pleasant experience.

5. Sarah’s ordeals are:

  1. She was thrown into the ordeals.
  2. Her own choice.
  3. Result of her bad planning.

6. “She is at odds with” means:

  1. She is a rebel.
  2. She is not respected in the society.
  3. She has many followers.

7. “Anxiety is on the increase” means:

  1. Intensity of anxiety is increasing.
  2. Duration of anxiety in increasing.
  3. The number of people with anxiety is increasing.

8. What does, “we are overstimulated” mean?

  1. We are angry.
  2. People of our time have too much emotions.
  3. People have anxiety because they take stimulants.

9. We used to have boundaries.

  1. In the past, we were not as free as we are now.
  2. In the past countries had clearly marked boundaries.
  3. In the past and now, we have restrictions.

10. When we say “We had cultural mores and structures,” it means:

  1. Society in the past was better structured;
  2. Society in the past had its own structures;
  3. Societies in the past were not well organized.

11. Based on the sentence, “Cultural mores and structures protected us from these kinds of primal blowouts,”:

  1. Cultural mores and structures kept anxiety at bay.
  2. Cultural mores and structures brought more anxiety into life.
  3. Cultural mores and structures kept invaders away.

12. We had a Sabbath because we all had an understanding that we needed a day of rest just to be able to cope with the toil of hoeing a field, and also to spend time with family;

  1. The writer projects the Sabbath’s religious sides.
  2. The writer projects the Sabbath’s social sides.
  3. The writer projects the Sabbath’s religious and social sides.

13. In “We had set bedtime hours and we had set work hours,” “set” means:

  1. Tentative.
  2. Fixed.
  3. Comfortable.

14. In saying “there were boundaries that were placed by our culture and structures,” the writer says:

  1. Says that in the past, anxiety was more than what it is today.
  2. Says that in the past, anxiety was less than what it is today.
  3. Does not compare anything.

15. “That has gone out the window in literally less than a generation.” What has gone out?

  1. Anxiety.
  2. Culture and structures.
  3. Boundaries.

16. Literally means:

  1. Exactly.
  2. Not exactly.
  3. More or less.

16. In the past Sarah shut herself away, taking time off from the outside world — a forced retreat.

  1. People forced Sarah to go into a retreat.
  2. Sarah decided to go into a retreat.
  3. Sarah forced people to be away from anxiety.

17. But her new way of dealing with her anxiety is to embrace it.

  1. Sarah is an escapist.
  2. Sarah is brave and bold.
  3. Sarah is a traditionalist.

18. To acknowledge its dangers.

  1. To be aware of its dangers.
  2. To fight its dangers.
  3. To accept its dangers.

19. To be wary, and then to try to harness it to her advantage.

20. As a tool for positive change.

What do you think?

Written by English Melon

Biju John, author of ByeBle and Maclins, is an English Language Trainer. He has also authored his educational Fiction. All these titles are available on Amazon and Google. You can contact his office on WhatsApp / Telegram number +917510923061

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