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OET30 Day 7

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OET30 Day 7

Subject - Verb Agreement

Emigration:

Day 7! How was your first Listening Mock Test, yesterday? Please write about your experience below. Some of the members have scored over 40!

  • 2 Day
  • Marks 100
  • Medium

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Welcome Message!

Day 7 - "I may Pass, I may Fail but I am Okay!"

It is always better to know about our enemies before we start the battle. 30% of OET candidates fail merely because of their fear before and during their exam! I am telling you, your enemy is this fear! Even if you go with a strong mind and bold steps, the panicky situation will weaken some of your hearts. So, how to keep your mind cool?

  • Never think that this exam is your last exam. Just say, “this is just another exam. It maybe the last but I don’t care. I will work again and may pass or fail. I am okay with both.”
  • My failure is not an indication of my poor performance. There are other factors too. Even the assessor can go wrong, which is why many candidates pass after remarking.
  • It is a game that everyone plays with money but the game is truthful. OET passes everyone out!
  • Prayer. Whether you believe in the power of Gods or not, just pray. Do not pray to take care of your exam results – but pray to take care of your exam.

All the best!!
Biju John and Team!

Program Details

Read, word by word! Do not miss any Task!

Dear Participant, OET30 is different from the traditional methods of practices-after-practices without acquiring skills. The key feature of OET30 by English Melon is building up skills first and then putting them in practice. To build up your skills, we have the following tasks:

  1. Labeling Method (R)
  2. Transcription Method (L)
  3. Grammar Training (SWiRL)
  4. Group-wise Speaking
  5. Live Corrections (Writing)
  6. Story Writing (SW)
  7. Quizzes (SWiRL)
  8. Word Power-Up (SWiRL)

Dos and Don’ts

  • From today, you will have just a single trainer!
  • Take your time but never miss a task! Stay motivated.
  • In case you have questions, openly ask them in the OET30 Telegram Group.
  • Be active in the group and be ready to help others.
  • Have faith in you, in me and in the Almighty!

Time Table

Kindly note that OET30 will follow a very flexible but fixed time table for everyone’s convenience. All the time references are in Indian Standard Time (IST)

TimeTask
10.00 AMPublishing Page
11.00 AMLive Correction 1
12.00 PMLive Correction 2
02.00 PMLive Role Play
03.00 PMLive Correction 3
07.00 PMLive Correction

Get Ready

Please note, you should have done the following preparation for participating OET30:

  1. Install Google Docs (if you are using a mobile phone / tab).
  2. Use only Google Chrome browser.
  3. You should have a notebook and pencil. Use only a pencil to practice.
  4. Practice with and without a headphone.
  5. Get in touch with your group members and get a speaking partner on Day 1 itself.

NB: Use a computer (laptop / desktop) for better experience. However, high end mobile phones can be used.

Today's Grammar - Subject - Verb Agreement

"One of his kidneys ___ damaged." (Is / Are)

If you look back, we have learnt about Nouns, Pronouns and Subjects on different days and then saw the rules of Tenses. Everywhere you can see the significance of subjects. The rest of the sentence depends on subjects! Today we have to see how subjects agree with verbs.

Agreement in Present Tense

Subject + Is, am, are, have, has, do (v1), does (vS)

Agreement of Verbs with Subjects is what form of the verb is used with a subject. Look at the list. You can see how Pronouns and Nouns (Subjects) agree with the verbs:

  • I + am, have, do,
  • We + are, have, do
  • You + are, have, do
  • They + are, have, do
  • He / She / It + is, has, does
  • Mr Alby + is, has, does
  • Aspirin + is, has, does

I + am, have, do

  1. I am thinking of surgery but I am afraid.
  2. I have to postpone the surgery.
  3. I do not think I should invest all my money in my treatment.

We + are, have, do

  1. We are thinking of surgery but we are afraid.
  2. We have to postpone the surgery.
  3. We do not think we should invest all our money in our treatment.

You + are, have, do

  1. You are thinking of surgery but you are afraid.
  2. You have to postpone the surgery.
  3. You do not think you should invest all your money in your treatment.

They + are, have, do

  1. They are thinking of surgery but they are afraid.
  2. They have to postpone the surgery.
  3. They do not think they should invest all their money in their treatment.

He / She / It + is, has, does

  1. He is thinking of surgery but he is afraid.
  2. He has to postpone the surgery.
  3. He does not think he should invest all his money in his treatment.

Mr Alby + is, has, does

  1. Mr Alby is thinking of surgery but he is afraid.
  2. Mr Alby has to postpone the surgery.
  3. Mr Alby does not think he should invest all his money in his treatment.

Aspirin + is, has, does

  1. Aspirin works very quickly.
  2. Aspirin has a quick effect.
  3. Aspirin does cause much side effects.

Agreement in Past Tense

Subject + was, were, had, did (v2)

Look at the list. You can see how Pronouns and Nouns (Subjects) agree with the verbs:

  • I + was, had, did,
  • We + were, had, did
  • You + were, had, did
  • They + were, had, did
  • He / She / It + was, had, did
  • Mr Alby + was, had, did
  • Aspirin + was, had, did

I + was, had, did

  1. I was thinking of surgery but I was afraid.
  2. I had to postpone the surgery.
  3. I did not think I should invest all my money in my treatment.

We + were, had, did

  1. We were thinking of surgery but we were afraid.
  2. We had to postpone the surgery.
  3. We did not think we should invest all our money in our treatment.

You + were, had, did

  1. You were thinking of surgery but you were afraid.
  2. You had to postpone the surgery.
  3. You did not think you should invest all you money in your treatment.

They + were, had, did

  1. They were thinking of surgery but they were afraid.
  2. They had to postpone the surgery.
  3. They did not think they should invest all their money in their treatment.

He / She / It + was, had, did

  1. He was thinking of surgery but he was afraid.
  2. He had to postpone the surgery.
  3. He did not think he should invest all his money in his treatment.

Mr Alby + was, had, did

  1. Mr Alby was thinking of surgery but he was afraid.
  2. Mr Alby had to postpone the surgery.
  3. Mr Alby did not think he should invest all his money in his treatment.

Aspirin + was, had, did

  1. Ten years ago this medicine’s effect was very quick.
  2. Ten years ago this medicine had quick effect.
  3. Ten years ago this medicine relieved pain in a minute.

Agreement in Future Tense

Subject + will, shall, will be, shall be, will have, shall have, will do

Look at the list. You can see how Pronouns and Nouns (Subjects) agree with the verbs:

  • I + will be, will have, will do,
  • We + will be, will have, will do
  • You + will be, will have, will do
  • They + will be, will have, will do
  • He / She / It + will be, will have, will do
  • Mr Alby + will be, will have, will do
  • Aspirin + will be, will have, will do

I + will be, will have, will do

  1. I will think of surgery but I will be afraid.
  2. I will have to postpone the surgery.
  3. I will not think I should invest all my money on my treatment.

We + will be, will have, will do

  1. We will think of surgery but we will be afraid.
  2. We will have to postpone the surgery.
  3. We will not think we should invest all our money on our treatment.

You + will be, will have, will do

  1. You will think of surgery but you will be afraid.
  2. You will have to postpone the surgery.
  3. You will not think you should invest all your money on your treatment.

They + will be, will have, will do

  1. They are thinking of surgery but they are afraid.
  2. They have to postpone the surgery.
  3. They do not think they should invest all their money in their treatment.

He / She / It + will be, will have, will do

  1. He will think of surgery but he will be afraid.
  2. He will have to postpone the surgery.
  3. He will not think he should invest all his money in his treatment.

Mr Alby + will be, will have, will do

  1. Mr Alby will think of surgery but he will be afraid.
  2. Mr Alby will have to postpone the surgery.
  3. Mr Alby will not think he should invest all his money in his treatment.

Aspirin + will be, will have, will do

  1. Aspirin will work very quickly.
  2. Aspirin will have a quick effect.
  3. Aspirin will cause much side effects.

Grammar Tests! Touch Here!

Time to Test!

We are now proceeding to Testing what we have studied so far.
If your score is less than 90%, please learn the rules and then retake the test.

Quiz One! Quiz Two

Reading Section

Attention! We will have no Reading tests on Day 1 to Day 5!

In Reading Section, you have the following tasks:

  1. Sentence Labeling (Mandatory)
  2. Paragraph Labeling (Mandatory)
  3. A Mock Test (Starting from Day 6)

NB: Make sure you complete the mock test in the exact time given in the question paper. The test materials will be made available in the Telegram Group Only!

Sentence Labeling

Summarize the sentences in a word or 2!

Labeling is ‘summarizing’ sentences and paragraphs in a word or a few words. By ‘labeling’, you prepare your brain to understand your reading extracts in the fraction of a second, without feeling ‘tired of reading.’ Labeling helps you with:

  1. Reading without getting tired;
  2. Understanding the ideas very quickly;
  3. Finding out the answers instantly and correctly.
  4. Most importantly, Enhancing your comprehension pattern based on Brain Mapping.

ExSample:

Write the label of the following sentences in a word or 2:

Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a disorder of the connective tissue characterized by fibrosis of the skin, vascular abnormalities, and presence of autoantibodies.

Label: What’s SSc?

To sum up, labeling of sentences involves the following steps:

  1. Read each sentence carefully (your brain works many times faster while labeling)
  2. Guess and write the summary / theme / title of the sentence.
  3. If the sentence has more than a single idea, separate each word with comma.

NB: After completing your training in labeling, you will be able to guess the summary of each sentence and each paragraph after reading the first few words (for sentences) / sentences (for paragraphs)!

Here are some very common “labels” for sentences:

  • What – Which – Who – When – Why – How
  • Symptoms – Process – Solutions

Sentences for Labeling

  1. An ELISA or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, is a method used in the laboratory to aid in the diagnosis of a wide range of diseases.
  2. This test is performed on blood or urine and is used for measuring the amount of a particular protein or substance in these bodily fluids, such as infectious agents, allergens, hormones or drugs.
  3. This test relies on the interaction between components of the immune system called antigens and antibodies.
  4. Antibodies are proteins produced by the body to identify and neutralise any foreign substances that may be encountered, such as viruses and bacteria.
  5. The substances to which antibodies are produced are known as the antigens as they stimulate an immune response.
  6. ELISAs are used for numerous types of tests in the laboratory which can assist in the diagnosis of many different conditions.
  7. It is most commonly requested if it is suspected you have been exposed to viruses such as HIV and Hepatitis B or C, or bacteria and parasitic infections such as Toxoplasmosis, Lyme disease and Helicobacter pylori.
  8. It can also measure levels of antibodies to see if you have been vaccinated against certain diseases such as mumps and rubella.

Important! These are just samples. You should proceed to as many sentences for sentence / paragraph labeling as possible.

Paragraph Labeling

Summarize the paragraphs in less than 10 words!

Labeling of paragraphs is ‘summarizing’ paragraphs in a a few words. By ‘labeling’, you prepare your brain to understand your reading extracts in the fraction of a second, without feeling ‘tired of reading.’ Labeling helps you with:

  1. Reading without getting tired;
  2. Understanding the ideas very quickly;
  3. Finding out the answers instantly and correctly.

Example 1

Cerebral contusions are scattered areas of bleeding on the surface of the brain, most commonly along the undersurface and poles of the frontal and temporal lobes.
They occur when the brain strikes a ridge on the skull or a fold in the dura mater, the brain’s tough outer covering. These bruises may occur without other types of bleeding or they may occur with acute subdural or epidural hematomas.

Label: General Information

Example 2:

Most patients with cerebral contusions have had a serious head injury with a loss of consciousness. Cerebral edema, or swelling, typically develops around contusions within 48 to 72 hours after injury.

Label: Symptoms

Example 3

As with other types of intracranial hemorrhages, cerebral contusions are most rapidly and accurately diagnosed using computed tomography (CT) brain scans.

Label: Diagnosis

Example 4

If pressure on the brain increases significantly or if the hemorrhage forms a sizeable blood clot in the brain (an intracerebral hematoma), a craniotomy to open a section of the skull may be required to surgically remove the cerebral contusion.

Label: Treatment

Example 5

Recovery after brain injury varies widely. Treatment outcomes vary according to size and location of the cerebral contusion. Other predictors include age, the initial Glasgow Coma Scale score, and the presence of other types of brain injuries.

Label: Outcome

To sum up, labeling of paragraphs involves the following steps:

  1. Read each paragraph carefully (your brain works many times faster while labeling)
  2. Guess and write the summary / theme / title of the paragraph.
  3. As a paragraph has 2 kinds of contents – central theme and contributing themes – separate each ‘label’ with comma.

Paragraph Labeling – in More Details

Labeling a Paragraph

How to label?

As you know, Part C Reading is 90% comprised of finding out what a particular paragraph mentions. In other words, you have to tell what each paragraph is about.

Let’s look at a few official examples. Here is the first paragraph of the text and the 7th question:

Millions of people who suffer sleep problems also suffer myriad health burdens. In addition to emotional distress and cognitive impairments, these can include high blood pressure, obesity, and metabolic syndrome. ‘In the studies we’ve done, almost every variable we measured was affected. There’s not a system in the body that’s not affected by sleep,’ says University of Chicago sleep researcher Eve Van Cauter. ‘Every time we sleep-deprive ourselves, things go wrong.’

7. In the first paragraph, the writer uses Eve Van Cauter’s words to:

  1. Explain the main causes of sleep deprivation.
  2. Reinforce a view about the impact of sleep deprivation.
  3. Question some research findings about sleep deprivation.
  4. Describe the challenges involved in sleep deprivation research.

Now, let’s apply labeling to find out the right choice! For this you have to summarize the entire paragraph into a label that consists of a word or a very few words, say, 5! Look at the paragraph again and read the labels below. Which summarizes the paragraph at its best?

Millions of people who suffer sleep problems also suffer myriad health burdens. In addition to emotional distress and cognitive impairments, these can include high blood pressure, obesity, and metabolic syndrome. ‘In the studies we’ve done, almost every variable we measured was affected. There’s not a system in the body that’s not affected by sleep,’ says University of Chicago sleep researcher Eve Van Cauter. ‘Every time we sleep-deprive ourselves, things go wrong.’

Step 1 – Original split into paragraphs

  1. Millions of people who suffer sleep problems also suffer myriad health burdens.
  2. In addition to emotional distress and cognitive impairments, these can include high blood pressure, obesity, and metabolic syndrome.
  3. ‘In the studies we’ve done, almost every variable we measured was affected. There’s not a system in the body that’s not affected by sleep. Every time we sleep-deprive ourselves, things go wrong.’ says University of Chicago sleep researcher Eve Van Cauter.

Step 2 – Known information removed

  1. People who suffer sleep problems also suffer health burdens.
  2. Emotional distress, cognitive impairments, high blood pressure, obesity, metabolic syndrome.
  3. Studies – almost every variable affected. All systems in the body is affected by sleep. Sleep-deprivation upset body and mind – Eve Van Cauter.

Step 3 – Crunching

  1. Sleep problems > health burdens.
  2. Impact on mind and body.
  3. Eve Van Cauter – No sleep, no health

Step 4 – Final Labeling

Sleep deprivation and health by Eve Van Cauter.

Now look at question number 7 and check which option is close to our label:

7. In the first paragraph, the writer uses Eve Van Cauter’s words to

  1. Explain the main causes of sleep deprivation.
  2. Reinforce a view about the impact of sleep deprivation.
  3. Question some research findings about sleep deprivation.
  4. Describe the challenges involved in sleep deprivation research.

The answer is B, “Reinforce a view about the impact of sleep deprivation.”

The Problem of Similarity!

Now the final problem is the problem of similarity. For many, all the options look correct! This is because the given paragraph vaguely touches some of the aspects in each option. How to look for the correct answer?

  1. Explain the main causes of sleep deprivation.
    1. The label does not have the word “causes.”
    2. Nowhere in the paragraph it mentions “causes.”
  2. Reinforce a view about the impact of sleep deprivation.
    1. The label does not have the word reinforce but altogether it is a reinforcement!
  3. Question some research findings about sleep deprivation.
    1. The label or paragraph does not have the word “Question” nor does it anywhere question anything.
  4. Describe the challenges involved in sleep deprivation research.
    1. Challenges are discussed in the paragraph but nothing about challenges in research.

During the procedure, your nurse will measure the length from your baby’s nose or mouth to their stomach. Your nurse will then mark the tube so it is just the right length for your infant. Then, they will lubricate the tip with sterile water or water based lubricating gel. Next, they will insert the tube very carefully into your infant’s mouth or nose. Occasionally doctors will insert the tube, but it is generally a procedure done by the bedside nurse.

Sample:

  • Measuring length – nose or mouth → stomach.
  • Marking tube – right length for infant.
  • Lubricating tip with strl water / water based lubricating gel.
  • Inserting tube carefully mouth / nose.
  • Done by 1. doctors 2. bedside nurses.

Paragraph 1

Other uses of the ELISA include:

  • Measuring certain hormone levels such as HCG in the pregnancy test, thyroid hormones
  • Detecting dust and food allergies
  • Detection of illicit drugs such as cocaine and methamphetamines.
  • Measuring antibodies which are produced in auto-immune conditions such as Lupus and rheumatoid arthritis.

Paragraph 2

Some kits are also available for the general public to use for example; the home pregnancy test is based on the ELISA principle and detects the presence of a hormone known as human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG) which is excreted in the urine of a pregnant woman.

Paragraph 3

PrEP is indicated for those at greater risk of HIV acquisition and therefore comprehensive history taking and risk assessment, including both sexual and drug taking histories, are required to identify those most likely to
benefit.

Paragraph 4

Clinicians will need to make pragmatic decisions with patients about future HIV risk, their need for PrEP and individual-level assessment of the benefit versus potential harms of PrEP. At a population level, given limited resources and a desire to achieve the maximum impact of PrEP, clinicians should use clinical criteria and recommendations as outlined in these guidelines, along with local and national criteria for NHS or clinical trial eligibility to provide PrEP to those at highest risk of HIV acquisition.

Paragraph 5

It is well recognized that there are other risk behaviors and vulnerability factors that increase the risk of HIV acquisition and these should be taken into consideration on a case-by-case basis by clinicians when considering eligibility for PrEP and assessing HIV risk. Although this lacks a clear evidence base, the writing group has considered this in terms of those who are ‘high risk’, and therefore PrEP would be recommended.

Listening Section

Attention! We will have no full length Listening Tests for the first 5 Days!

In Listening Section, you have the following tasks:

  1. Transcription of at least 1 part of the given audio/s.
  2. Labeling of the Audios
  3. A complete test (From Day 6 onward)

NB: Make sure you complete the mock test in the exact time given in the question paper.

What is Transcription Task?

Go ahead and transcribe (write down) listening task audios that you have received on registration for OET30 Program. Listen as many times until you got all the words!

NB: Transcription Method will bore you and it takes a lot of time but this will change your listening experience!

Transcription Task

  1. Pick any OET Listening Audios / Listen to the short audios below.
  2. Get your headphone, pen, notebook and the device to play back the audio.
  3. Start playing back and listen carefully.
  4. As you listen to the audio, start writing down the conversations in the notebook.
  5. You will have to pause, stop, rewind and forward the playback head many times.
  6. Complete writing the transcription.

That’s all!

NB: When you play back large audio files, listen continuously till the end and write the transcription, leaving blank spaces whenever you fail to understand a particular word. After reaching the end of the audio, replay and fill the blanks.

Labeling Task

Listen to the short audios below and, applying the paragraph labeling you have mastered by now, write the short labels of the audio in a word or in a few words.

Important! The Listening audio for each day is shared every morning and the same will be deleted at the end of the day.

Speaking Section

Warm-up, Role Plays and More

In Speaking Section, you have the following tasks:

  1. Reading a warm up question with sample answer.
  2. Writing your own answer to the warm up question.
  3. Completing a quiz of the given role play!

Additionally:

  1. Read as many OET Speaking books and refer to OET Official website, E2 Language, Odin English, Swoosh, etc.
  2. Listen to OET official videos.
  3. Watch medical interviews.

Today’s Introductory Question

Describe a time you had to deal with a difficult patient and how you handled that.”

Working with elderly patients always presents unique challenges as we are dealing with people who are used to being independent and who are now totally reliant on strangers. I remember one gentleman who presented a tough time in my career. He was angry and argumentative and would often fight with nurses over things as little as the variation in his room’s set temperature. I admit, I wasn’t excited when I found I was going to be working for him. To prepare myself, I looked over his charts. I discovered that his wife had died a number of years ago and that he had no friends or family in the area and hadn’t had a visitor for ages. Rather than treating him just as a patient, I did my best to connect with him as a human. I would talk to him, not just at him. It took a little, but eventually he came around and ended up being one of my favorite guests to who bonded with me so strongly.

ROLE PLAYER’S CARD

Setting: Office of a School Nurse

PATIENT:

You (Ken) are a 15-year-old teenager boy who has been informed to visit the school nurse. You have bruises on your legs and red spots all over the body. You visited the doctor three weeks ago, when these symptoms started and he told you it was due to deficiency of vitamin C.

TASKS:

  • Answer the nurse’s questions honestly.
  • Tell him/her that you didn’t take much vegetables and fruits.
  • Ask him/her, if you can take pills for vitamin C.
  • Inquire how long will it take to cure.

CANDIDATE'S CARD

Setting: Office of a School Nurse

NURSE:

You are school nurse. Ken, a 15-year-old teenager boy who is visiting you regarding the bruises on his legs and red spots all over the body.

TASKS:

  • Ask whether he had visited the doctor for his condition
  • Explain the effects of scurvy (bleeding gums, bruise easily)
  • Emphasize the importance of vitamin C in the body
  • Encourage the patient to take veg-vegetables and fruits.
  • Ask him to come for a review in one week.

Your Task

  1. Speak with your speaking partner (Recommended)
  2. Write the entire conversation and share in the group (Ultimate)
  3. Take the Quiz below (Mandatory):

Tip 7 – Signposting changes in topic

Signposting is a name commonly given to words or phrases that express a connection between two ideas and make the transition from one point to the next in speaking. It can link ideas within a sentence or link two or more sentences together. It helps to make speaking flow smoothly, without any abrupt, disjointed breaks that leave the listener wondering what your points have to do with one another or what their relevance is.

Examples:

  1. Firstly, let me present a brief history of MRI technology since 1980ies.
  2. Secondly, this is not very crucial in your case.
  3. As we discussed earlier, this virus has a short life span.
  4. Apart from this, you have eaten a lot of junk food.
  5. For example, your inability to cope with Australia’s weather changes need to be seriously considered.
  6. In most cases, this infection doesn’t last more than a week.
  7. Similarly, you can try drinking cucumber juice or drinks that have a lot of vitamin D.

Speaking - Role Play. Touch Here!

Time to Test!

Below is an activity / Quiz related to today’s speaking.
Take the Quiz!

Writing Section

Let's write and Assess Letters here!

Today’s Writing Tasks are:

  1. Read the case note carefully (because most of them are modified or new).
  2. If you are a member of today’s Group, Type / write the letter and post in the premium “OET30” Telegram Group.
  3. If you are not a member of today’s group and still want regular letter correction, buy a writing package right now and submit your letters for correction.
  4. If you have a personal Take your note book and write down your letter.
  5. Attend the 7.00 pm Live Correction sessions.
  6. In case you missed the Live Correction, you can view the same Offline. That doesn’t make much difference.
  7. Also, attempt the unsolved tests.

What should you do?

NB: Check if you can join Live Corrections (Live/Offline). If this doesn’t work, you should not enroll for OET30 Programs.

Decide on what platform you will join the Live Sessions.

  1. Mobile / Android Tabs: Click Here and see if this link opens in your Google Docs app.
  2. PC / Laptops: Click Here

If clicking opens a page with “Welcome to OET30 Live Page!,” you can join my Live Sessions. You can join OET30 Programs.

OCCUPATIONAL ENGLISH TEST

WRITING SUB-TEST: Nursing

TIME ALLOWED: READING TIME: 5 MINUTES
WRITING TIME: 40 MINUTES

Read the information about the proper use and disposal of chemicals used in school laboratories and complete the writing task which follows.

Abscisic Acid

  • Physical hazard – Nil
  • Health hazards – Causes serious eye irritation; Causes skin irritation; May cause respiratory irritation
  • Environmental hazard – Nil
  • Lowest grade allowed – Elementary demos only
  • Storage category – 0 – 1
  • Experiments where used – Botany – effects of plant hormones
  • Disposal method – Dispose as solid waste

Acetal

  • Physical hazard – Highly flammable liquid and vapour; May form explosive peroxides
  • Health hazards – Causes serious eye irritation; Causes skin irritation
  • Environmental hazard – Nil
  • Lowest grade allowed – Ban Candidate (Not to be allowed)
  • Storage category – O-3 Flam Cabinet
  • Experiments where used – None
  • Disposal method – Dispose as hazardous waste.

Acetaldehyde

  • Physical hazard – Extremely flammable liquid and vapour; May form explosive peroxides
  • Health hazards – Causes serious eye irritation; May cause respiratory irritation; Suspected of causing cancer
  • Environmental hazard – None
  • Lowest grade allowed – Ban Candidate (Not to be allowed)
  • Storage category – O-3 Flam Cabinet
  • Experiments where used – NONE. Formerly used as: Organic substrate in organic reactions.
  • Disposal method – Highly reactive chemical – assessment required before disposal

Acetamide

  • Physical hazard – None
  • Health hazards – Suspected of causing cancer
  • Environmental hazard – None
  • Lowest grade allowed – Middle School
  • Storage category – 0 – 2
  • Experiments where used – Melting points. Heat of fusion (enthalpy) experiments.
  • Disposal method – Dispose as hazardous waste

Acetanilide

  • Physical hazard – Not known
  • Health hazards – Harmful if swallowed
  • Environmental hazard – Nil
  • Lowest grade allowed – High school
  • Storage category – 0 – 2
  • Experiments where used – Organic substrate used in organic reactions.
  • Disposal method – Dispose as hazardous waste.

Acetic Acid (<1 Molar)

  • Physical hazard – None
  • Health hazards – Causes serious eye irritation; causes skin irritation
  • Environmental hazard – Nil
  • Lowest grade allowed – All grades
  • Storage category – Misc
  • Experiments where used – Volcano experiments (tame version); Neutralizing base spills
  • Disposal method – Dispose as hazardous waste. Neutralization option available

WRITING TASK:

You are Mr S Smith, head nurse at Department of Child Health, Sydney. Write a letter to the head teachers of all the schools with detailed information about the risks school children are exposed to in dealing with chemicals at middle and high school levels. Include all vital information including hazards, safety and disposal methods.

In your answer:

  • Expand the relevant notes into complete sentences
  • Do not use note form
  • Use letter format
  • The body of the letter should be approximately 180 – 200 words.

Writing Format

Follow this format

Please read the case notes and write 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and 7 on your question paper.

Who is the recipient of the letter?

  1. Doctor – Do not include much social history
  2. Social worker – Give detailed social history
  3. Physio – Medical history
  4. Write only what the recipient need to know.

Who is the patient?

  1. Age
  2. Gender – Do not interchange “he” and “she”
  3. Condition – The present condition only.

What is the purpose?

  1. Single purpose?
  2. Multi purpose?
    1. Decide what is the present condition.
    2. Sometimes the case notes will present more than 2 – 3 purposes but you have to decide what is the present condition.
  3. If multi purposes, decide who is the prime patient.

What are irrelevant?

  1. Based on the recipient and patient’s condition some information are irrelevant
  2. Always ask – “Should the recipient know this condition / problem of the patient?
  3. Why? Why not?
  4. Some irrelevant expressions:
    1. She lives with her husband (she can’t live with someone’s husband) No need of “Her”
    2. If a disease condition is not present now, that also is not important
    3. I don’t remember many examples. Will update later.

Difference between admission date and discharge dates

  1. In some cases, the patient is not admitted (wound dressing, emergency)
  2. In some cases, the discharge date will not be given.
    1. Admitted on 1st Novemebers
    2. Diagnosed on the second day
    3. Surgery on the fifth day
    4. 4 days of post operative care
    5. 1 day under observation
  3. In such cases, you have to make a calculation and write

What is the trick in this case notes?

  1. Too much information (decide only what is relevant)
  2. The question of “Known – not known case”
  3. A new genre of task, like, “information letter!”
  4. Too many medicines names to a social worker
  5. Confusing about “who is the real patient…

Known case or not known?

  1. If there is an expression like, “his/her gp” it is known case
  2. Refer him back to Dr Mattew (Known)
  3. Refer him to Dr Mattew (Not known).

Expanding Notes

How to Expand two or more words to a sentence?

At the end of this task, you will be able to expand single and multiple words into meaningful sentences.

  • Add more words before and after the “note”.
  • Change word into phrase; change phrase into clauses; change clauses into sentences.

Notes:

Mr Morgan – presented – 27th – coronary artery bypass graft – recuperated well BMI above normal – advised to stop smoking, reduce alcohol intake.

Expansion

Mr Morgan was presented to hospital on 27 of this month with the aforementioned diagnosis for which he underwent coronary artery bypass graft and has recuperated well. His body mass index is above the normal level and he has been advised to stop smoking and reduce alcohol intake.

Notes:

Ms Tan – well able to transfer by herself  – walker – weakness, limited ability to move – requesting home care visits – assist her with personal care – incontinence of bladder, bowel occasionally.

Expansion

At present Ms Tan is well able to transfer and move by herself with the aid of a walker but due to her physical weakness and limited ability to move, she is requesting home care visits from your service to assist her with personal care. Worth noting is, this elderly woman experiences incontinence of bladder and bowel occasionally.

Checking the 6 + 1 Criteria

Live Letter Correction

Writing Marking Criteria!

On this Day 5, let me explain the 7 criteria upon which OET assesses your letters. If you focus only on a few but not all, you will not B!

  1. Purpose – What action do you want the recipient take after reading this letter?
  2. Content – What should you write and what not?
  3. Conciseness and Clarity – Relevant or irrelevant?
  4. Genre & Style – Do you know to whom you are writing?
  5. Organization and Layout – Does it look like a letter?
  6. Language – Does your language confuse or clarify?

Not official but very much crucial – Handwriting! Can the assessor read you?

Writing Marking Criteria!

On this Day 5, let me explain the 7 criteria upon which OET assesses your letters. If you focus only on a few but not all, you will not B!

  1. Purpose
    1. Clearly mention the purpose of the letter in the first paragraph and expand the same in the last paragraph.
    2. Write the purpose of writing the letter very quickly and efficiently.
    3. It checks if your communication tells something clearly or not.
  2. Content
    1. The content criterion examines a number of aspects of the content:
    2. All key information is included
    3. Information is accurately represented
    4. Audience awareness is key here. The writing needs to be appropriate to the reader (and their knowledge of the case) and what they need to know to continue care.
  3. Conciseness and Clarity
    1. Health professionals value concise and clear communication.
    2. This criterion, therefore also considers:
      1. Whether unnecessary information from the notes is included and how distracting this may be to the reader, i.e. Does this affect clarity?
      2. Is there any information that could be left out?
      3. How well the information (the case) is summarised and how clearly this summary is presented to the reader.
  4. Genre & Style
    1. Referral letters and similar written handover documents need to show awareness of genre by being written in a clinical/factual manner (e.g. not including personal feelings and judgements) and awareness of the target reader through using professional register and tone.
    2. The use of abbreviations should not be overdone thereby assuming common prior knowledge.
    3. A nurse should not write medical terms when a letter is written to a patient’s parents (especially if they are not very educated).
    4. Can you use abbreviations?
      1. Yes, if the recipient understands.
      2. Yes, if written to a medical colleague in a similar discipline, then judicious use of abbreviations and technical terms would be entirely appropriate,
      3. No, if the recipient doesn’t understand.
      4. No, if the medical colleague was in a totally different discipline.
      5. No if a letter was from a specialist to a GP, more explanation and less shorthand would be desirable.
      6. Minimize medical jargon.
  5. Organization and Layout
    1. Health professionals value documents that are clearly structured so it is easy for them to efficiently retrieve relevant information.
    2. This criterion examines how well the document is organised and laid out.
    3. It examines whether the paragraphing is appropriate, whether sub-sections within the document are logically organised and whether key information is clearly highlighted to the reader so that it is not easily missed.
    4. The criterion also considers whether the layout of the document is appropriate.
  6. Language
    1. OET letters are not like IELTS writing tasks.
    2. In OET you should not show your linguistic skills.
    3. Language should be used only to communicate, not to impress!
    4. Your words should not obstruct retrieval of information.
    5. Use accurately, appropriately.
    6. Your language should not interfere with reading comprehension or speed.
  7. Handwriting! The most important!
    1. Suppose OET sent you the case note and its answer a day before the exam and sent you!
    2. You learnt the letter by heart and went to the exam!
    3. In the exam hall you wrote the letter just as OET sent you the answer but your handwriting is readable to only one person in the world – and that is you.
    4. What if your handwriting is not legible?

Live Corrections. Touch Here!

Live Correction!

Live Letter Corrections are conducted on Google Docs from 10 AM to 4 PM, one every hour. Please make sure you have Google Docs (only if you are on a Mobile).

Go to the Live Page.

Followed by Vs Following

Learn how to use these words correctly!

Both, “followed by” and “following” have the same meaning.

  1. Surgery is always followed by intensive care.
  2. Following surgery, intensive care was initiated for Mr Peter.

In the first sentence, “surgery” happens first.

In the second sentence, also, “surgery” happens first.

Speak Well!

Speak into the Mike

If Google can understand you, your interlocutor will, too!

This is a very important task. You have to use a little technology to do this task. Do not worry, you already have this technology with you. All you need to do is, take your smartphone and:

  1. Open Google Docs
  2. Create a New Document by clicking on the + button below
  3. Click on the Microphone button on top of the keypad
  4. Start speaking the text below.

Image result for mic button mobile keypad

NB: You will have to speak many times. Initially Google may not recognize your accent so you will need to try several times.

Common complaints of patients who have received thyroidectomy include dysphonia (voice dysfunction) and dysphagia (difficulty swallowing). One cause of these surgical outcomes is recurrent laryngeal nerve paralysis. Many studies have discussed the effectiveness of speech therapy (e.g., voice therapy and dysphagia therapy) for improving dysphoria and dysphagia, but not specifically in patients who have received thyroidectomy.

Story Completion

Write a story based on the verbal input below:

You may be wondering why you have been asked to write a story! Write this story because this is very important and is included in all the 30 days.

By writing a story from imagination, you develop qualities outside medical skills, like:

  1. Imaginative skills that will help in speaking.
  2. Ability to shift between past tense and present tense.
  3. Skill to work with imagination while listening to a conversation.

How to write a story?

  1. Read the verbal input which is usually the beginning limes, middle lines or closing lines.
  2. Mostly stories are written in past tense so your story should be written in past tense (90%) and the rest (10%) in past tense and future tense.
  3. You can see a sample story each on This Page.

Write a simple story with the following starting:

Mr Morgan had been waiting for Dr Andrew when the latter reached home at midnight. He had a hard and long day at hospital and all he wanted was to fall down on the bed. When Mr Morgan told the young doctor that his wife had been laboring since that evening, he felt helpless.

But he had to attend the call.

Learning Words

Learn these words and power up your language skills!

It is important that you learn at least 500 new words during these 30 – 45 days. Take your time and try this test.

Note: The following words occur in your Listening, Reading, Speaking and Writing Sub-tests. Learn carefully!

Diagnosing Knee Injuries:

The initial evaluation by the health care professional will begin with a medical history. Whether the evaluation is ___ (1) immediately after the injury or weeks later, the physician ___ (2) ask about the mechanism of injury to help isolate what structures in the knee ___ (3) damaged. Is the injury due to a direct ___ (4) that might suggest a fracture or ___ (5) (bruise)? Was it a twisting injury that causes a ___ (6) or meniscus tear? Was there an injury associated with a ___ (7) foot to place stress and potentially tear a ligament?

Further questions will ___ (8) other symptoms. Was swelling present, and if so, did it occur ___ (9) or was it delayed by hours? Did the injury prevent weight-bearing or walking? Does going up or down steps ___ (10) pain? Is there associated hip or ankle pain? Is this an isolated injury, and have there been other occurrences?

Past medical history and information on medications and allergies will be helpful information to learn about the patient.

Physical examination of the knee ___ (11) with inspection, in which the physician ___ (12) look at the bones and make certain they are where they belong. With fractures of the kneecap or patellar tendon injuries, the kneecap can slide high out of position. Also, patellar dislocations, where the kneecap ___ (13) to the outside or lateral part of the knee, are easily evident on ___ (14). Looking at how the knee is held is also important. If the knee is held slightly ___ (15), it can be a clue that there is fluid in the joint space, since joint space is maximal at 15 degrees of flexion.

Your Choices:

Will, might be, flexed, blow, cause, slides, begins, Occurring, may, address, inspection, contusion, cartilage, planted, right away

Correct Answers:

1. occurring, 2. ask, 3. might be, 4. blow, 5. contusion, 6. cartilage, 7. planted, 8. address, 9. right away, 10. cause, 11. begins, 12. will, 13. slides, 14. inspection, 15. flexed

Word Power-up. Touch Here!

Time to Test!

Do not forget to enter your email ID. After “Submit”, proceed to “View Score.” If your score is less than 80%, please learn the rules and then retake the test.

Take this Quiz!

Irregular Verbs (In OET) with G

All verbs are not "treat - treated - treated"

Get Got Got
Give Gave Given
Grind Ground Ground
Go Went Gone
Grow Grew Grown

Biju John

Love for English begins with understanding its unknown rules. Biju John lives on the internet, teaching OET, IELTS and PTE. More than a million students have thanked him from their heart.

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